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InlsFinalProject

Page history last edited by PBworks 13 years, 7 months ago

InlsFinalProject - initial notes

InlsFinalProject2 - 14-Jul, 15-Jul - generation

InlsFinalProject3 - 16-Jul - generation

InlsFinalProject4 - 17-Jul - generation

InlsFinalProject5 - 22-Jul - composition

InlsFinalProject6 - 23-Jul - cheat sheet PDF


 

 

books/sources

  • THINKING ON PAPER
    • base most of the talk on this
  • REVISING BUSINESS PROSE
    • paramedic triage for prose
    • may not have time to do this
  • writing your dissertation in 15 minutes a day
  • bird by bird

 

TITLES

  • les payne's writing clinic
  • creating your first draft with less pain
  • the (almost) painless writing clinic

 

OUTLINE

 

delicious links on presentations: http://del.icio.us/brownstudy/presentations

 

don't wait for the muse

 

the artist's way -- writing 3 pages/day in your journal. getting the writing habit. becoming more facile simply at the process of writing.

 

the anecdote about the pottery students, point of quantity over quality

 

write first and let the words find you

  • when you talk to yourself, and you're practicing what you're going to say to a friend or lover or roommate or parent, you rehearse the moment over and over, trying to get the words right, trying to get the word order right

 

divide writing into a discrete sequence of processes:

  • brainstorm

 

the goal is to squeeze out a first draft that you can then edit

  • shitty first draft, zero draft, vomit draft

 

mark forster's continuous revision process

  • will i have time to discuss this alongside the formal writing process?

 

intro: during the course of this course, we've had to write job descriptions, grants, disaster plans, etc. ideally, in the real world, you would have text or a template or boilerplate to base your stuff on. but sometimes you have to create something from whole cloth that doesn't exist. and then you have to sit down and write something that has never before existed in the history of the world.

 

write yourself little emails every day

 

write in a wiki that stores your changes

 

revising vs rewriting

  • two schools of thought
    • revising: who wants to retype all of that? it's much easier to tweak something you've already got, it could take an awfully long time to retype a long thesis or dissertation.
    • retyping -- I adhere to this one, if what you're doing means a lot to you. i do this with my short stories. lew shiner: you have to write it the way the reader reads it, one word at a time. for him, a first draft takes a 12-18 months. he researches, edits, and then retypes from the start: takes another 12 months.
  • what does the THINKING ON PAPER book say?

 

karen joy fowler--hates writing first drafts, loves editing

 

my nanowrimo experience -- 1,663 words/day in november. you can't get behind.

 

fred pohl would print out his first draft and then delete it from his hard drive to force himself to retype it.

 

write in complete sentences.

 

write first the scenes or passages you can visualize strongly or that you're most passionate about. no law that says you have to start from the beginning.

 

let the beginning emerge.

 

let the themes emerge. you want the process to be organic.

 

clip or copy/paste the squibs into paragraphs, group the paragraphs into sections. don't force anything.

 

separate the articulation from the communication, separate the communication from the public performance.

 

el doctorow: writing a novel is like driving by night.

 

little and often.

 

see the forster book on working a big project--some good quotes there.

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